Law firm withdraws from representing former church pastor in case against church

Former Celebration Church pastor is seeking reinstatement

The Minneapolis law firm representing Londa Lundstrom Ramsey, former pastor of Celebration Church in Lakeville, has filed a notice of withdrawal from the case, which was filed in South Dakota.

Facebook photo
Londa Lundstrom Ramsey holds a microphone in front of her father, Lowell Lundstrom Sr., who holds a Bible. Lowell Lundstrom died in 2012.

The Minneapolis law firm representing Londa Lundstrom Ramsey, former pastor of Celebration Church in Lakeville, has filed a notice of withdrawal from the case, which was filed in South Dakota. Attorneys with the firm Bassford Remele filed notice on Aug. 29 withdrawing their representation of Lundstrom Ramsey and her brother, Lowell Lundstrom Jr., because their lead attorney with expertise in that area of legal claims and defenses has left the firm

The court is expected to approve the request. Celebration Church attorney Sheila Engelmeier said the siblings are still be represented by a small law firm in South Dakota.

The siblings filed the lawsuit this summer seeking control of their deceased father’s ministry, Lowell Lundstrom Ministries.

It names the ministry and 12 individual church members, including the church’s current lead pastor, claiming Lundstrom Ramsey was wrongly terminated and the church and ministry are mismanaging church assets they claim were last valued at $23 million.

Lundstrom Ramsey became lead pastor at Celebration Church in 2010 and was involuntarily removed from the position in 2014 during a major falling out at the church involving her and her husband, Brent Clark Ramsey, who was permanently removed from serving as pastor by the church’s board of directors in July 2014.

Multiple former and current Celebration Church members and Lowell Lundstrom Ministries employees filed affidavits stating Lundstrom Ramsey had mismanaged church funds, verbally and mentally abused staff and covered up sexual abuse allegations against Clark Ramsey.

This newspaper first reported the story in August, and Lundstrom Ramsey did not return messages seeking comment.

She has posted several comments on social media accounts since the story ran, including an Aug. 30 comment expressing gratitude for true friends “who have actually showed up for our family in our time of struggle and have ignored the fake news.

You know who you are. Thank you so much! We are so grateful” The post included a photo of a pride of lions coming toward the camera and “Proverbs 17:17, ‘A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for a time of adversity.’ ”

In an Aug. 25 Twitter post, Lundstrom Ramsey posted a picture of a field with the words, “Sometimes you think you’re being buried, when you’re really being planted. God is using this season to grow you.”

On July 31, the court denied Lundstrom and Lundstrom Ramsey’s legal filing for a temporary restraining order against the church.

Engelmeier said the restraining order was intended to stop the ministry from selling property the nonprofit owns, including its headquarters in South Dakota, where the ministry started.

When denying the temporary restraining order, Engelmeier said the judge noted critical elements were not met, including proving the siblings are likely to win their case and demonstrating they would be harmed if there was not a ruling in their favor.